Hearing Ourselves Think: Cognitive Research in the College Writing Classroom

By Barbara M. Sitko; Ann M. Penrose | Go to book overview
Save to active project

8
Revising for Readers: Audience Awareness in the Writing Classroom

KAREN A. SCHRIVER

Audience. Revision. These topics resonate for composition teachers and researchers. Over the last two decades, we have seen a burgeoning of work on audience and revision. Although the efforts in these areas have not been fully integrated, we can draw at least one conclusion: We need new research-driven pedagogies for helping students to revise for readers. The ability to revise one's prose for an audience is a valuable asset in school or in the workplace. But up to this point, we have seen few teaching methods developed from what research and experience have shown us. Redefining revision in the classroom cannot occur unless we are able to translate research into action. Just what have we lear Ned that teachers can employ and that writers can use? My aim here is to provide research-driven advice for helping writers to anticipate readers' needs. To do so, I first review the research on audience awareness and revision processes. Then I illustrate how the research can be applied in the classroom by providing a case study of a revision problem. Finally, I offer some ideas for teaching revision.


What We Know About Audience Awareness and Revision Processes

TEACHING AUDIENCE: LESSONS FROM RESEARCH

Rhetoricians have been concer Ned with the study of audience since antiquity and the impact is readily apparent in the curricula of most writing classrooms.

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hearing Ourselves Think: Cognitive Research in the College Writing Classroom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?