The Mind of Frederick Douglass

By Waldo E. Martin Jr. | Go to book overview

Notes

Abbreviations
A-SCBPL: Anti-Slavery Collection, Boston Public Library
Life and Writings: Philip S. Foner, ed., The Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass
Douglass Papers (LC): Library of Congress, Frederick Douglass Papers
Douglass Papers (HUMSC): Moorland-Spingam Collection, Howard University, Frederick
Douglass Papers

Chapter I
1.
Douglass, Narrative, 21; Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 31-34.
2.
Douglass, Narrative, 21-22; Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom, 51, 79-88; Douglass, Life and Times, 45-49; Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 173.
3.
Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom, 59.
5.
Ibid., 52; Prichard, Natural History of Man, 1: 157. For a different, yet nonetheless stimulating, interpretation of this issue, see Walker, "Frederick Douglass", 252-54.
6.
Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom, 60, 57.
8.
Ibid., 60, 38, 53; Douglass, Life and Times, 30, 32.
9.
Douglass, Life and Times, 30.
12.
Ibid., 71; New York Herald, 6 Sept. 1866.
13.
Douglass, Life and Times, 78-79.
23.
"Slavery, the Free Church, and British Agitation Against Bondage", 3 Aug. 1846, Blassingarne, Douglass Papers, ser. 1, 1:318- 19; "Our Position in the Present Presidential Canvass", Frederick Douglass' Paper, 10 Sept. 1853, in Life and Writings, 2:212.
24.
Douglass, Life and Times, 111.
26.
"The Danger of the Republican Movement", 28 May 1856, Life and Writings, 5:388; Douglass, Life and Times, 115-17, 121.
27.
Douglass, Life and Times, 121-24.
39.
Ibid., 165-66, 193; Sprague, My Mother as I Recall Her; Preston, Young Douglass, 149, 151-52.
40.
Douglass, Life and Times, 197-205.
42.
Ibid., 206; Douglass to "Dear Friend" [Isabel Jennings], Sept. 1846, Douglass Papers (LC), r1; Shepperson, "Frederick Douglass and Scotland", 307; Life and Writings,

-285-

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The Mind of Frederick Douglass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - The Shape of a Life 1
  • 1 - The Formative Years and Beyond 3
  • 2 - Abolitionism: the Travail of a "Great Life's Work" 18
  • 3 - The Politics of a Race Leader 55
  • 4 - Humanism, Race, and Leadership 92
  • Part Two - Social Reform 107
  • 5 - The Ideology of White Supremacy 109
  • 6 - Feminism, Race, and Social Reform 136
  • 7 - The Philosophy and Pursuit of Social Reform 165
  • Part Three - National Identity, Culture, and Science 195
  • 8 - A Composite American Nationality 197
  • 9 - Ethnology and Equality 225
  • Part Four - The Autobiographical Douglass 251
  • 10 - Self-Made Man, Self-Conscious Hero 253
  • Epilogue 281
  • Notes 285
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 317
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