Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

tuition and additional--that is, marginal--costs. One college president said, quite appropriately, that we would gladly take more students if they would concentrate in classics, but if they choose to study in the sciences, the additional costs make this prohibitive. And many administrators with excess capacity realized the improved financial status with rising enrollment.


FOOTNOTES
1
Part of this chapter (since revised) was given to the Planning and Policies Committee of the American Council on Education in June, 1958. A shortened version was published in the Educational Record, July, 1959.
2
Speech to the American Council on Education, Oct. 10, 1958.
3
I find average costs per resident student, exclusive of those irrelevant for higher education, in 1955-56 for public IHL were $750. I also estimate that unit current educational costs per student would have to rise by 40 per cent, or $300. This total of $1,050 should be increased by at least $250 for capital costs ($1 billion per year for more than 4 million students). Hence the unit cost would be about $1,300.
4
But D. Wolfle and J. G. Smith have shown that for men of roughly equal ability, the income of college students greatly exceeds that of noncollege students (see "Occupational Value of Education for Superior High-school Graduates," Journal of Higher Education, 1956, pp. 38-39).
5
Cf., for example, the views of the president of Stephens College, who is impressed by the high incomes of the college graduate: J. M. Wood, "The Stephens College Fiscal Policy," Journal of Higher Education, October, 1933, p. 353. In reply to my position Neiswanger expressed skepticism concerning the material gains of higher education, and also suggests that these are irrelevant considerations: W. A. Neiswanger , "Tuition Policy and Benefits Received," Educational Review, July, 1959, esp. pp., 194-195.
5a
aSee my Market for College Graduates, 1949, esp. part I, Chaps. 1-3, 6.
6
Estimate by P. C. Glick and H. P. Miller, "Educational Level and Potential Income," American Sociological Review, 1956; cf. T. W. Schultz, Education and Economic Growth, p. 79, where he estimates the gain at $137,000 for graduates of past.
7
See S. E. Harris (ed.), Higher Education in the United States: The Economic Problems, 1960; also D. S. Bridgman in Office of Education Bulletin 9, 1930, and Journal of Engineering Education, no. 3, November, 1931, p. 175.
8
Cf. Research in Economics of Higher Education, Office of Education, May 31- June 1, 1960. (Mimeographed.)
9
See O. Eckstein in Higher Education in the United States: The Economic Problems, 1960.
10
Ibid. Eckstein finds that prepayment for ten years at a rate of interest of 3 per cent would provide $4,000 for four years of college at an annual cost of $365 ($383 inclusive of insurance of parent). For twenty years of insurance and an annual rate of 5 per cent only $130 (and $143 inclusive of insurance) would be required. These figures suggest the wisdom of a twenty-year policy and not one under the control of savings banks that pay little.
11
Obviously, not all students would have to borrow. With a median family income of $7,000 (and about $7,600 for the family at age of sending son or daughter to college), it is doubtful that more than 60 per cent would have to borrow.

-166-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education: Resources and Finance
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 716

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.