Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

in the United States. At any rate the application of the British system, even if applied only to full-time students, might well cost the taxpayer $2.5 billion yearly currently, and much more by 1970. (This is a very rough estimate.)

Table 14-5 is a rough estimate on the basis of incomes of college families in 1952-53 and current costs.15


CONCLUSION

How much will be needed for scholarships depends on numerous factors: the recourse to loans and employment as substitutes for scholarships; tuition policy; the rise of total costs and of family income; the extent to which loss of capable students is explained by economic and noneconomic factors; the determination to help where it is most costly, that is, for the lowest third of families by incomes. Above all, we stress the point that student aid of $200 to $300 million today is indeed small compared to $3 billion of subsidies made available through pricing below costs.

Some estimates of required scholarship aid for 1960 follow. (The 1970 total would be twice as large to cover increased enrollment and a rise of stipends to match increasing incomes.)

Millions of dollars
1.The President's Commission on Education beyond the High School (roughly 750,000 at $1,000)750*
2.To save 50,000-100,000 able students now lost in each class400
3.Item 2 plus aid for students in need now in college, not receiving help600
4. Monro's proposal, $500 for each student2,000
5.Application of scholarships on the basis of CSS formula under which scholarships are allocated on basis of need as measured by family incomes900
6.Provision of scholarship funds for the nation equal to sums available per student in the 23 IHL with largest scholarship funds per student600†
7.Application of the British policy to the United States1,500‡
8. Eisenhower administration proposals, 195816
9. Kennedy proposals, 1961(average five years)30
*Presumably largely non-Federal government.
†Part-time students excluded.
‡Part-time students excluded, and allow $500 for employment earnings.

My recommendation would be a rise of scholarships currently from less than $150 million (inclusive of outside scholarships and fellowships) to around $500 million now and $1,000 million by 1970. I believe that spokesmen for higher education generally would approve such a program if the grants, unlike those of the National Merit Corporation or the original GI or the British system, were not tied to costs varying with the institution. Tying the grants to the cost of attending different institutions would result in opposition of public institutions and private ones not

-205-

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