Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

In Table 21A-2 I compare Columbia, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, and Yale, for which figures are available. Among these four institutions there are substantial differences in the number of undergraduates who receive scholarships, varying from 40 per cent at Johns Hopkins to 23 per cent at Columbia. In medicine the percentages are a maximum of 40 at Harvard and a minimum of 13 at Columbia. In law the respective figures are 36 per cent for Yale, 18 per cent for Harvard, and 11 per cent for Columbia. Close to 90 per cent of the students at the Harvard Divinity School receive scholarships, and 50 per cent at Yale. In graduate work the percentages vary from 71 at Johns Hopkins to 9 at Columbia, with 33 per cent for Harvard and Yale. The amount of awards varies substantially also, with Harvard a maximum for undergraduates at $723 and Johns Hopkins a minimum at $530. In medicine the maximum is $656 for Columbia, and only $414 for Yale. Against a large percentage of students getting law scholarships at Yale is the low average grant of $371 against $690 at Harvard and $549 at Columbia. In graduate instruction the largest fellowships are at Harvard and Yale with $1,090 and $1,080, and the lowest at Columbia with $515. Except at Columbia the value of the graduate fellowship exceeds those in the various professional schools as well as the undergraduate average.

The figures suggest that the professional graduate schools rely on loans more than the undergraduate colleges, both in numbers aided and in average amounts. But on the whole Columbia and Johns Hopkins are far behind Harvard and Yale in these matters. The average loan at Yale is in roughly equal amounts in all the different schools, whereas at Harvard they tend to be much larger in the professional schools and graduate schools, except in Divinity, where the tuition is low.

Aid varies greatly according to the school. At Harvard, for example, in twenty-five years tuition rose by $8.2 million, or 350 per cent, but aid rose by $5.5 million, or 1,200 per cent.

Harvard College:
1,271, or 26 per cent, received gift aid in 1957-58
= $1,136,140
586 received loans= 233, 882
Graduate School of Arts and Science: two-thirds received aid= 2,000,000*
Business School: 35 per cent received aid (more than half in loans)= 658,125
Law School: one-third received aid:
In scholarship
= 335,000
In loans= 193,000
School of Public Health: 92 per cent received aid= 341,134
*See footnote n on page 289.

FOOTNOTE
1
Material compiled from The Educational Future of Columbia University, p. 230, and HEW, Financial Aid, College Students: Graduate, 1957.

-285-

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