Insatiable Appetites: Twentieth-Century American Women's Bestsellers

By Madonne M. Miner | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In a sense, my Aunt Marsha is responsible for what follows. When I was twelve years old and quite capable of devouring novels by the dozens, she loaned me her well-worn copy of Gone with the Wind. I was transfixed and, at least temporarily, satiated. I now want to thank her for that loan, and to thank others who have made loans of a slightly different kind.

I am indebted to friends and colleagues--most especially Meg Kelley, Sarah Cliffe, Bruce Carey, Cathleen Carter, and Bob Torry--who have kept me alive and thinking; to Professors Mimi Goehlke and Mark Savin of the University of Minnesota, for their care and encouragement during my early graduate school years; to participants in the State University of New York at Buffalo Women's Writing Group, who read most of these chapters in rough draft and offered suggestions for revision; to Professors Claire Kahane, Leslie Fiedler, and John Dings of the State University of New York at Buffalo for their focused attention and insightful commentary; and to members of the University of Wyoming English Department.

And finally, I am most grateful to Professor Marcus Klein. Without him, the book could not have come into being.

-ix-

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Insatiable Appetites: Twentieth-Century American Women's Bestsellers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: "Guaranteed to Please the Female Reader" 3
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - Gone with the Wind: And the Cupboard Was Bare"" 14
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - Forever Amber: Swollen Up like a Stuffed Toad"" 35
  • Notes 55
  • 3 - Peyton Place: The Uses--And Abuses--Of Enchantment"" 58
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - Valley of the Dolls: Wow! What an Orgy!"" 78
  • Notes 98
  • 5 - Scruples: It's as Addictive as Chocolate"" 101
  • Notes 123
  • Conclusion 126
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index 153
  • About the Author 159
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