Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

IHL receiving their benefactions, graduated in larger proportions and went on to graduate work in larger numbers than all students. Business dominated the interests of these donors.

It is of some importance for IHL greatly dependent upon gifts from alumni to consider carefully their admission policies from this angle. This study suggests at least that the potential donors are also likely to be good students. To this extent we may be assured that they will not be excluded from first-class colleges. But increasing emphasis on aptitude tests and school grades in the years of rising competition for openings at college may well exclude many of those who, for example, through their benefactions provide about two-thirds of the income of a $3,500 education at Harvard for which the student pays only $1,200. We need improved techniques for discovering the future philanthropists and other men of eminence.


FOOTNOTES
1
Paul David processed the answers to this questionnaire and also made many helpful suggestions for the statistical treatment.
2
Council for Financial Aid to Education, 1958-59, Voluntary Support of America's Colleges and Universities, p. 9.
3
See U.S. Census, Income of Families and Persons in the United States, 1958, p. 51; Fact Book on Manpower, BLSM Bulletin 1171, September, 1954, p. 54; S. E. Harris, "Who Gets Paid What," The Atlantic Monthly, May, 1958, pp. 35-38.
4
We had many difficulties in classifying the donors--e.g., business engineers were classified as engineers, women were not classified by the occupation of husband who acquired the funds, "retired" is a difficult category, and we had no information for 9 per cent of the sample.
5
Cf. the admirable report, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Admissions to Harvard College, 1960, especially pp. 32-35, 46-50.
6
In one instance the gift was from a mother and in another from the father. (The son's class was used.)

-478-

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