Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

graduated from college, but only 30, 19, 10, and 4 in the 61st-to-80th, 41st-to-60th, 21st-to-40th, and 1st-to-20th percentiles respectively. Obviously the better students survive in larger numbers. Again, of the top 0.1 per cent in ability, 69 per cent graduated from college; of the top 1 per cent, 59 per cent graduated, and 49, 42, and 34 per cent graduated of the top 5, 10, and 20 per cent, respectively. What is more, the percentages of freshmen graduating from college increased from 37.9 per cent in 1931 to 44.4 per cent in 1950. These figures are subject to some reservations, however, in view of the depressed conditions in 1931.24


CONCLUSION

IHL are not as efficient or productive as they might be for many reasons: the nature of the organization and hence excessive blocks by faculty; the difficulties of measuring productivity; the unavailability of facts and analysis; the concentration of attention on additions to budgets, not on the existing budgets; a failure to keep objectives in mind; institutional obstacles to the choice of the best students and faculties; inadequate contributions of trustees; misleading publicity of IHL.


FOOTNOTES
1
"Current Issues in Higher Education," Proceedings of the Eighth Annual National Conference on Higher Education, March, 1953, p. 92; cf. E. Hodnett, Industry-College Relations, 1955, chap. 20.
2
H. R. Bowen, "Is the Self-contained College Economically Feasible?" Liberal Education, March, 1960, p. 65; C. Davidson, "Painless Economies," 34th Annual Meeting of Eastern Association of College and University Business Officers, December, 1953, pp. 67-77.
3
HEW, Design for Cooperative Action: A Branch Working Paper, 1959; P. C. Reinert , "What Charges Must Be Made . . .: Current Issues in Education," Proceedings of the Eighth Annual National Conference on Higher Education, 1953, p. 17.
4
On the basis of business accounting practices.
5
Cf. B. R. Morris, "Faculty Salaries, Class Size and Sound Education," AAUP Bulletin, June, 1959, pp. 195-202.
6
Cf. R. H. Simonds, "To Increase Man-Hour Output in Higher Education," The Educational Record, October, 1958, pp. 332-39.
7
C. Scheps, "The Business Officer's Place in the Hierarchy of Administration," College and University Business, June, 1960, p. 31.
8
A Statement by a Select Group of College and University Trustees on the Responsibilities of Trustees for Educational Objectives and Curriculum, 1960, p. 3 (mimeographed); cf. P. H. Davis, Putting Trustees and Volunteers to Work, February, 1960 (mimeographed).
9
Proceedings of the Legislative Workshop on Financing Higher Education, Apr. 27-29, 1958. Cosponsored by the Western Governors' Conference, The Western

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