Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

new college plan. Supported by the resources available in these four institutions, the authors of this plan propose a liberal arts college which could provide a high-quality education to 1,000 students at a relatively low unit cost. The proposal involves a revolutionary type of education through the cooperation of these four colleges. Economies would be possible because extracurricular activities of limited educational value would be prohibited in the new college and because courses would be carefully scrutinized and their number kept to a minimum. As a result of this and because of the reduced course requirements for students, the ratio of student to faculty would be 20 to 1 as against the national average of about 13 to 1.*


FOOTNOTES
1
Bulletin of the Association of American Colleges, vol. 19, 1933, p. 291; H. W. K. Fitzroy, in Current Issues in Higher Education, 1958, pp. 153-154.
2
Science and Technology Act of 1958, Senate Document no. 90, pp. 44-45; M. W. Ertell, "Towards a Philosophy of Interinstitutional Cooperation," The Educational Record, April, 1958, pp. 131-135.
3
On the Southern Regional Compact, see J. E. Ivey, "An Emerging Regional Program in Higher Education," The Educational Record, April, 1952; McG. L. William , "Dreams into Reality: Regional Planning in Education in the South," School and Society, Jan. 6, 1951; R. S. Sugg Jr., "Regionalism in Higher Education," Journal of Higher Education, February, 1956; "The Southern Regional Educational Program," School and Society, Mar. 8, 1952.
4
See "Seven College Plan to Cooperate with State Departments of Education," School and Society, June 16, 1951; "Middle Atlantic State Universities Cooperate to Improve Educational Administration," School and Society, Apr. 21, 1951; "Western Interstate Compact," Higher Education, October, 1955; "Western Interstate Compact for Student Exchange Programs," Higher Education, January, 1951; New England Board of Education, Annual Report, 1957; and Higher Education, Oct. 11, 1954; also see L. B. Mayhew, "Interinstitutional Cooperation through Regional Studies," Higher Education, March, 1955; Dressel and Mayhew, "Educational Planning and Research," Educational Record, April, 1953.
5
See, for example, A. J. Brumbaugh and R. S. Sugg Jr., "Recent Developments in State and Regional Planning of Higher Education," The Annals, Higher Education under Stress, September, 1955, pp. 32-40.
6
"Liberal Arts Colleges Cooperate with the Illinois Institute of Technology," School and Society, Feb. 6, 1954; "The Minnesota Inter-college Cooperation," School and Society, Jan. 26, 1952; "Temple Cooperation with Two Colleges," School and Society, December, 1951; "A New University Center in Georgia," School and Society, June 10, 1944; R. T. Esterquest, "The Midwest Inter-library Center," Higher Education, Jan. 1, 1950; H. W. K. Fitzroy, "The Richmond Area University Center," The Educational Record, July, 1957, pp. 241-249; First Annual Report of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest, 1960.
7
See, for example, "Current Issues in Higher Education," Proceedings of the Eighth Annual National Conference on Higher Education, 1953, pp. 98-101; "Cooperative Intercollegiate Program of Graduate Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Seven Southern California Colleges,"
____________________
*
A recent study ( HEW, Cooperative Projects among Colleges and Universities, 1961) summarizes current practices.

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