Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

average less than 30 scheduled hours per week, with class enrollments after the first month of the term averaging 60 per cent of room capacity."19

In California we also find careful estimates of required construction in the years to come. For example, on the basis of assured construction, capacity will rise from 272,719 (full-time enrollment) to 361,429, or an increase of 32.6 per cent. The rise would be 26 per cent for junior colleges, 59 per cent for state colleges, 51 per cent for the University of California, and 18 per cent for independent colleges and universities. Of the total rise of 79,000 the independent colleges and universities would account for only 11,000, or about 14 per cent.

By 1975 the projected enrollments would be 648,650, with 361,429 provided for by funded capacity. Hence construction funds have to be provided for 361,000 additional students.20


Conclusion

Plant use is much less efficient than it might be. Resistance of students and faculty to afternoon and Saturday classes is one important cause of waste.21 But the responsibility lies in part with administration also. They have shown little interest in studying the utilization of plant.

Returns to a questionnaire on new IHL or new schools also reveal that the opening of these institutions or schools and their locations were often not subjects of adequate and careful examination. An over-all survey of professional schools also points to bad distribution. Large economies might be had by greater centralization of schools with high unit costs, combined with transportation subsidies for students.

In the light of the fact that total capital costs on existing plant are approaching $2 billion per year, an improved use of plant through increased access in unpopular hours, through improved matching of size of class and enrollment, through central control of assignment of space, through longer school year, through more considered establishment of new units and location on improved theories of location--through these and other means, savings as large as $1 billion a year by 1970 are within the realm of the possible.


FOOTNOTES
1
HEW, Memo to the Board, 1960 Series, no. 4, 1960; HEW, Council For Financial Aid to Education, 1958-1959, 1959, p. 13.
2
A Study of the Need for Additional Centers of Public Higher Education in California, 1957, pp. 131-32.
3
"Geographic Origins of Michigan College Students," The Survey of Higher Education in Michigan, Staff Study no. 2, 1957, p. 31.
4
Minnesota Commission on Vocational and Higher Education, Higher Education Looks Ahead, 1953, p. 13.

-620-

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