Judging Social Security: The Adjudication of Claims for Benefit in Britain

By Richard Young; John Baldwin et al. | Go to book overview
Index of Subjects
adjudication of claims:
appeals process, use of 23
bureaucratic rationality 16-17
Department of Employment, by 2
Department of Social Security, by 1
initial decision making 16-18; weaknesses in 207-8
justice models 16
medical issues, determination of 15
moral judgement 16-17
political constraints 2
professional treatment 16
research into 13; findings 37-9
review: appeal, advantages over 66; appeal after 67; formal, rules governing 66; possible tribunal hearing, influence of 208; request for 65; statutory conditions for 66; study of 67-8; time for 66
rights of appeal, erosion of 22
rule of law 21-4
social security appeal tribunals, by 2; see also social security appeal tribunals
strengths of system 206
adjudication officers:
accuracy and expedition, balancing 39-41
appeals officer: disagreement with 78; relationship between 80-1
bureaucratic rationality, working within 17
CAO 29; Annual Reports 36-7; criticisms 82; reorganization of DSS, view of 207-8
civil servants, as 29
consultation within office by 59
contributory benefit 53-4; appeals, delay in processing 93;
reluctance to revise decisions 81- 2; self-review by 81-3
decisions of: changing, methods of 66; legislation, hide bound by 57; options in 32; papers, based on 32; review of 29
Department of Employment:
accuracy, importance of 61-2; independence, view of 60-2; local office administrative staff, separation from 61; specialization in adjudication 60
income support: accuracy and speed, balancing 43-4; administrators, as 52; checking, work involving 42-3; CAO, guidance provided by 49-50; decision making by 74; experience relied on by 48-9; interviews with 41-53; law, guide to 48-9, 52; performance indicators 44; process of adjudication, view of 42; qualities required 44-5; social security appeal tribunal, whether influenced by 86-9; speed, requirement of 45; support for 46-8, 59-60; teams 42; techniques, lack of training in 50
independence: Department of Employment offices, of 60-2; discretion, in exercise of 57; isolation from superiors, as 59; misinterpretation of notion of 56; pressure, effect of 57-9; understanding of 54-6
law, errors of 129
legal position and carrying out of work distinguished 38
number of 26
number of claims before 16
office culture 56
officers being 28
origins of 26
performance, internal monitoring 18
presenting officers, as, see presenting officers

-223-

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Judging Social Security: The Adjudication of Claims for Benefit in Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Social Security Policy and Adjudication 1
  • 2 - Adjudication in Local Offices 26
  • 3 Internal Reviews and Appeals Work in Local Offices 65
  • 4 - Appeals Before Social Security Appeal Tribunals 96
  • 5 - The Chairmen and Members 125
  • 6 - The Appellant 154
  • 7 - The Presenting Officer at the Appeal Hearing 180
  • 8 - Conclusion 205
  • Bibliography 214
  • Index of Names 221
  • Index of Subjects 223
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