Gods and Heroes of the Greeks: The Library of Apollodorus

By Michael Simpson; Leonard Baskin et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
The Family of Pelasgus, Including Lycaon, Callisto, and Arcas; Atalanta; the Family of Atlas, Including Hermes; Asclepius; the Birth of Helen; Castor and Pollux; Helen's Marriage with Menelaus; Dardanus and the Trojan Line; the Founding of Troy; Priam and His Children; the Family of Asopus, Including Aeacus, Peleus, and Telamon, and Achilles and Ajax (3. 8. 1-3. 13. 8)

BOOK 3 8 Let us return now to Pelasgus. Acusilaus says that he was a son of Zeus and Niobe, as I have thought [ 2. 1. 1], but Hesiod says that he was born from the earth. To him and to Meliboea, the daughter of Ocean, or as some say, to a nymph, Cyllene a son Lycaon was born, who was king of Arcadia and by many women had fifty sons. They were Melaeneus, Thesprotus, Helix, Nyctimus, Peucetius, Caucon, Mecisteus, Hopleus, Macareus, Macednus, Horus, Polichus, Acontes, Evaemon, Ancyor, Archebates, Carteron, Aegaeon, Pallas, Eumon, Canethus, Prothous, Linus, Coretho, Maenalus, Teleboas, Physius, Phassus, Phthius, Lycius, Halipherus, Genetor, Bucolion, Socleus, Phineus, Eumetes, Harpaleus, Portheus, Plato, Haemo, Cynaethus, Leo, Harpalycus, Heraeeus, Titanas, Mantineus, Clitor, Stymphalus and Orchomenus. [ Apollodorus only names forty-nine.] These were the most arrogant and impious of all men. Zeus, wishing to determine how impious they were, came to them in the guise of a laborer. They offered him hospitality, and at the suggestion of the elder brother, Maenalus, slaughtered one of the native children, mixed his viscera with the sacrifices, and placed them before him. Zeus in disgust overturned the table at the place which is even now called Trapezus ["Table"], and with thunderbolts killed Lycaon and his sons, except for Nyctimus, the youngest. Before he could strike him, Earth seized his hand and checked his wrath. After Nyctimus inherited the kingdom, the flood in the time of Deucalion occurred. Some say that it was caused by the impiety of Lycaon's sons.1

2

Eumelus and some others say that Lycaon also had a daughter, Callisto. Hesiod, however, claims that she was one of the nymphs; Asius says that she was the daughter of Nycteus; and Pherecydes says that she was the daughter of Ceteus. She hunted with Artemis, wore the same type of clothing as the goddess, and swore to her to remain

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