Relocating Middle Powers: Australia and Canada in a Changing World Order

By Andrew F. Cooper; Richard A. Higgott et al. | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

This book on Australian and Canadian middle power diplomacy evolved out of the authors' shared interest in how their two countries were seeking to respond to the profound challenges they confronted in the changing international political economy in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In writing it, we incurred a large number of debts.

We would particularly like to thank External Affairs and International Trade Canada in Ottawa and the Canadian High Commission, Canberra, which awarded Murdoch University, with Richard Higgott as the principal researcher, the Canada-Australia Bicentennial Institutional Research Award for 1990. The purpose of this award -- a gift from the Government of Canada to Australia on the occasion of the Australian bicentennial in 1988 -- is to encourage research cooperation between the two countries. Indeed, the generous terms of the grant afforded all three authors an opportunity to overcome the 'tyranny of distance' imposed by the Pacific Ocean. We would like to offer a special personal thanks to Ron Hughes of the Canadian High Commission, Canberra, who was so helpful in the administration of the award at all stages. Needless to say, what has resulted from this trans-Pacific collaboration does not in any way represent the views of the Government of Canada.

Cooper and Nossal gratefully acknowledge the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada through research grants they both held at various stages of this project.

We would also like to express our gratitude to the Australian National University and to the Aid to Scholarly Publications Programme of the Social Science Federation of Canada for financial assistance in the publication of this book.

At the time the Canada-Australia Bicentennial Award was granted, Higgott was a member of the faculty of Murdoch University, and we

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