General Benjamin Franklin: The Military Career of a Philosopher

By J. Bennett Nolan | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

A COMPLETE list of the works consulted for the narrative of Franklin's campaign on the Lehigh would constitute a bibliography of the more important historical source books of the period. No detailed account of any participant appears to survive, so that the itinerary of the expedition must be recreated by piecing together scraps of information contained in contemporary letters, diaries, and governmental bulletins. Since the march was made in a time of nominal peace, war between France and England not having been formally declared until after Franklin's return to Philadelphia, there are few references amongst the official archives in London. The minutes of the Pennsylvania Assembly are available but are exasperatingly inadequate. Of the many biographers, Parton alone accords some space to the episode but has not probed beneath the obvious sources of information.

Franklin's sojourn in Bethlehem is to be followed through the Moravian diaries, never fully translated and remaining as one of the greatest untapped reservoirs of American colonial history. The Autobiography, as has been previously observed, is not always trustworthy. The letters written by Franklin from camp are naturally more dependable and, few as there are, some of these seem to have

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General Benjamin Franklin: The Military Career of a Philosopher
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I - The Imperiled Frontier 1
  • II - The Journey to Bethlehem 16
  • III - Christmas at Easton 28
  • IV- New Year at Reading 40
  • V - The Return to Bethlehem 58
  • VI - The March to the Frontier 67
  • VII - The Building of the Forts 74
  • VIII - The Colonel of The Philadelphia Regiment 86
  • Bibliography 99
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