CHAPTER III
THE WESTERING WHEEL

IN the last part of the year 1846 Emerson received a letter from an English acquaintance, Mr. Alexander Ireland, who urged him to come to England and deliver courses of lectures in response to invitations to be obtained from various organizations in the English counties. Mr. Ireland had been Emerson's guide in Edinburgh in 1833, and united the practical gifts which made him "the king of all friends and helpful agents" with a "sweetness and bonhomie" that convinced Emerson that "a pool of honey" lay "about his heart." The invitation found the lecturer in one of those moods of suspense and stagnation incidental to men who depend on stimuli which they cannot control. Emerson had, as he says, "a good deal of domestic immoveableness-- being fastened down by wife and children, by books and studies, by pear trees and apple trees," but his need, in his homely phrase, of "a whip for his top," seconded by importunities from Mr. Ireland and impulsions from his wife, proved more than a counter-weight to his objections. His name was known in England to an extent that surprises those who realize the slowness with which it was traversing America. Applications for lectures "flowed in" to the rejoicing Mr. Ireland, and Emerson's time had to be safeguarded by refusals.

"So," says Emerson, "I took my berth in the packet

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Prefatory Note *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I: - The Crescent Man 1
  • Chapter II: - "Full Circle" 45
  • Chapter III: - The Westering Wheel 115
  • Chapter IV: - The Harvest 157
  • Chapter V: - Emerson as Prose-Writer 227
  • Chapter VI: - Emerson as Poet 274
  • Viii. Conclusion 294
  • Chapter VII: - Emerson's Philosophy 297
  • Chapter VIII: - Foreshadowings 360
  • Index 375
  • Complete Works 381
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 381

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.