Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior the Hixon Symposium

By Lloyd A. Jeffress; California Institute of Technology Hixon Fund | Go to book overview

Functional Differences between the Occipital and Temporal Lobes*
WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE INTERRELATIONS OF BEHAVIOR AND EXTRACEREBRAL MECHANISMS

HEINRICH KLÜVER The Division of the Biological Sciences, University of Chicago

I shall first briefly consider certain behavior alterations following bilateral removal of the occipital lobes in subhuman primates, more particularly, the changes observed in rhesus monkeys.


FUNCTIONS OF THE OCCIPITAL LOBES

I shall not describe the techniques I have developed for testing such animals (34-37, 40). Nor shall I bother you with the details of the experimental analysis. I shall simply point out that such animals in. which the geniculostriate system has been eliminated have been studied for a long time before and after the operations. In some instances, thirty to forty-five trials per day have been given for more than 2000 days after the lobectomy. In studying the behavior of the bilateral occipital monkey I have been chiefly concerned with analyzing the responses of the dark-adapted animal to luminous stimuli differing in brightness, area, shape, color, and/or distance from the eye as well as the responses to intermittent light stimuli differing in light-dark ratios and flash frequencies per second. The results of this laborious analysis may be briefly summarized by saying that all or practically all differential reactions of the bilateral occipital monkey to visual stimuli can be understood by assuming the effectiveness of differences in the density of luminous flux at the eye or, expressed otherwise, differences in the quantity of light entering the eye (39, 41, 43). The eye of such

____________________
*
Aided by the Dr. Wallace C. and Clara A. Abbott Memorial Fund of the University of Chicago and by the Commonwealth Fund.

-147-

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