Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form

By Tarik A. Fathy | Go to book overview

his own activities interactively in nonlocational relationships. Telecity, on the other hand, is a place where a critical mass of individuals shares access to multilevel teleactivities. Telecity provides its inhabitants with the means for new information technologies whose psychological neighborhoods may overlap. The psychological neighborhood concept is individually based, while the telecity concept is collectively based. Both exhibit different physical dimensions -- the psychological neighborhood is placeless, yet telecity spatially exists and is virtually connected to the whole world.

The telecity is the concentration of individuals, households, firms, and public agencies who interactively communicate and interconnect via remote services and facilities, and work in a wide geographical area. Los Angeles can be considered to be at the first stage of a telecity with its thirty-five distributed subcenters. Telecommunication appears to have strategic importance to arrange any kind of social and economic activity in its widely expanded landscape.

The next chapter examines the propositions of the emergence of multilevel teleactivities and their aggregation to create telecity. Applying an appropriate research design will validate these assumptions.


NOTES
1.
Since the agricultural sector's share in the labor force and national product is limited in modern society, it does not heavily influence the current transformation process, nor does it occupy a central part in technological change.
2.
The information society does not displace the industrial society, but the new developments overlay the previous social characteristics. Indeed the introduction of new technologies does not always mean the complete demise of older technologies ( Kranzberg 1985).
3.
The shift toward information-based activities is accompanied by social problems such as unemployment, invasions of privacy, information inequality, and high segregation in division of labor based solely on skills ( Salvagio 1983). Workers, particularly the middle-aged, have to acquire new abilities and skills to be able to use new industrial machines or automated office equipment ( Rogers 1984).

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Technology and Society 11
  • Notes 23
  • 3 - The Emergence of the Information Society 25
  • Notes 47
  • 4 - An Application of Futures Research 49
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Telecity: A Theoretical Analysis 77
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Telecity Form and Structure: Review and Conclusion 93
  • Appendix A - LIst of Panelists 105
  • Appendix B - The Delphi Exercise 109
  • Bibliography 133
  • Index 153
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 155

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.