Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form

By Tarik A. Fathy | Go to book overview

6
Telecity Form and Structure: Review and Conclusion

The development of a structure of centers containing major spaces for activities is the basis for elaborating on the telecity concept, which has been derived from the previous three perspectives. Telecity centers are modules for the new city structures. They are the arrangement by multiple levels to articulate space in a large and complex environment. Yet, they impose an extra burden of organization on the observer, especially if there is little relation among these levels. Telecity centers' dependence on virtual networks, which connect the superimposed structure to the city inhabitants, and the interpretive process of teleactivities location require a high degree of redundancy in common elements to link different levels of structures cognitively.

A distribution of these structures can be abstracted as an arrangement of focal points (or nodes) with a special character. The pattern can be seen as a network, with a form in itself, a degree of connectedness, a scale, and a degree of specialization. This multinodal nonhierarchical pattern accommodates multipurpose or highly specialized activities, and accordingly, information flows peak at these points or broadly disperse. When describing flows and flow facilities, a network description is clearly appropriate and applies to other kinds of linkages: social, economic, or even visual ( Lynch 1984, 357). Along with focal or

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