The Chicago Tribune: Its First Hundred Years - Vol. 1

By Philip Kinsley | Go to book overview
Save to active project

On February 17 the draft enrollment committee reported that the Governor had admitted that the enrollment was a grievous wrong. Cook County, the committee said, had put 18,786 men in the field, and on percentage of population were 1,400 men ahead of the quotas. The Governor agreed to have the Adjutant General go to Washington with the committee. The old committee appointed to visit Washington was discharged and the following appointed in its place: Colonel R. M. Hough, City Controller S. S. Hayes, and Joseph Medill. The Senators and Congressmen were to help in Washington. Provost Marshal James said that there was only one way to free the quota and that was to provide men. The last quota had been cut fifty per cent, he said, but that was only putting off the evil day.

The military situation was considered hopeful at this time. "The grand combine movement is bearing fruit," said the Tribune on February 18. "Grant says that with 100,000 fresh troops he can terminate the rebel government by May 1. The people are rapidly furnishing the men. The same Providence, in harmony with whose eternal laws of justice and righteousness we are fighting, has guided us to success hitherto and still guides us."


CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN
"THE OLD MAN IS RIGHT"

CHICAGO'S quota troubles were finally settled in February of 1865. They were not settled to the satisfaction of the Chicago committee headed by Medill, which held its famous interview with the President as reported in the Tribune at the time. But

-366-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Chicago Tribune: Its First Hundred Years - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?