Psychology of the Child and the Adolescent

By Robert I. Watson; Henry Clay Lindgren | Go to book overview

and speculative theorizing that were characteristic of the field before World War II.


A View of Child Psychology Today

If child psychology is compared with the natural and social sciences, it is evident that it is an unusual discipline. Child psychology is young-- indeed, in its childhood--and it is in a formative state that is changing and challenging. The field is full of exciting complexities.

G. Stanley Hall, the father of the child study movement, lived less than a century ago, whereas Sir Isaac Newton, called the father of physics, lived three centuries ago. Any science evolves slowly, progressing by means of the interplay of ideas and experiments. As each part of the body of knowledge both checks and spurs on the other parts, a theoretical framework evolves to serve as the basis for further advances.

Because child psychology is so young, it can be expected to continue its development. It will do so more slowly than other disciplines, because it deals with more complexities and more variables than other disciplines such as the natural sciences. For example, "H2O" means an identifiable molecule, but "child" has no such specific and recognizable limits. We are studying a class of immature living organisms. Each member of this class responds to two sets of events, those within the organism and those out in the environment, and both of these types of events are slowly changing. Each way of studying a child--such as the developmental or the environmental--is useful; but combined, the ways are more important than they can ever be separately.

This book is only an introduction to child and adolescent psychology; it cannot make you an expert on children or adolescents. We can hope to interest you to go further and perhaps to extend the boundaries of this young science, to become a new Hall or Binet or Piaget. We shall be satisfied if you become a more informed and more competent person than you would have been if you had not studied child psychology, and if, by learning more about what you were, you achieve a better understanding of what and who you are.


summary

Although common sense would tell us that children are intrinsically interesting, our forebears had an entirely different opinion. From the end of the Roman Empire until the rise of the modern middle class, western society did little to discriminate between children and adults. Discipline was severe, and in some countries children were bound as apprentices at an early age.

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychology of the Child and the Adolescent
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 626

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.