Psychology of the Child and the Adolescent

By Robert I. Watson; Henry Clay Lindgren | Go to book overview

TABLE 6-3. Correlations Between the Amount and Kind of Stimulation Available in Infants' Homes and Their Mental Test Sores at Various Ages (data from Elardo, Bradley, and Caldwell, 1975)
Mental Test Scores
Ratings of Potentially Stimulating
Variables in the Home Environments
of Infants Aged Six Months
Bayley
at
6 mos.
Bayley
at
12 mos.
Stanford-
Binet at
36 mos.
Emotional and verbal responsivity -.01 .09 .25*
of mother
Avoidance of restriction and punishment .00 .04 .24*
Organization of physical and temporal .22 .26 .40**
(time) environment
Provision of adequate play materials .15 .07 .41**
Mother's involvement with the child .06 .00 .32**
Opportunities for variety in daily .20 .16 .30**
stimulation
Total score .14 .16 .50**
Test scores
Bayley score at 6 months - .41** .28*
Bayley score at 12 months .41** - .32**
Stanford-Binet at 36 months .28** .32** -
*Correlation of moderate significance (p<.05)
**Correlation of considerable significance (p<.01)
(Other correlations are not significantly different from zero)

current mental status is an important source of information, even though his score has only limited predictability for his future status ( Bayley, 1970).


summary

Physical development is very rapid during the first year of life, when the infant increases his length by over a third and his weight triples. Biological measures taken early in life are better predictors of later physical development than are the psychosocial variables in the infant's environment. Nutrition is a major factor in physical development, and poorly nourished infants are retarded in their cognitive development. Research with undernourished children in Peru suggests that placing such children on an adequate diet for an extended period does not bring them up to the norm on cognitive measures. But investigators following

-218-

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