Congress or the Supreme Court: Which Shall Rule America?

By Egbert Ray Nichols | Go to book overview

CONGRESS AND THE CONSTITUTION*

Representative J. BURRWOOD DALY, of Pennsylvania

MR. DALY.--Mr. Speaker, it seems to me that Conress is wasting a great deal of time and effort, in discussing extraneous matters and matters that do not properly concern us. I allude to long, loud, and I might say acrimonious discussions on the Constitution. As I understand it, the duty of this body is to pass such legislation as it deems wise and in accord with the mandate of the people and let another department of the Government decide the constitutionality of its acts.

I know of no authority lodged in the legislative branch of the Government giving it the right to interpret its own acts. I know of no authority giving it the right to decide the constitutionality of its own acts. I have always and still do believe that the interpretation of the law and the deciding of its constitutionality are powers vested in the judiciary and in the judiciary alone. The functions of each of the three branches of the Government are clearly defined in the Constitution, and whether the legislation passed by this body is constitutional or not is not to be determined by this body.

From almost every Member on the Republican side, and I regret to state a few on the Democratic side, I have listened to wails of anguish concerning the alleged

____________________
*
Extension of remarks of Hon. J. Burrwood Daly of Pennsylvania, in the House of Representatives, Monday, August 19, 1935. Cong. Record v. 79 (cur. file) No. 172, P. 14212, August 19, 1935.

-240-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Congress or the Supreme Court: Which Shall Rule America?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.