The Cambridge Press, 1638-1692: A Reexamination of the Evidence concerning the Bay Psalm Book and the Eliot Indian Bible as Well as Other Contemporary Books and People

By George Parker Winship | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE BAY PSALM BOOK

FAME AND IMPORTANCE

THE third output from the Press was "the psalms newly turned into metre." It is the first thing printed in English America that can be called a book and the first that can still be seen. It has long ranked among the world's most famous books. This is due largely to the enormous influence that printed matter has had upon the expansion of the United States, economically and culturally, and in part to the persistent vogue of book collecting which has kept pace with the prosperity that followed the expansion. Its fame is also an inheritance of considerable antiquity, going back to the time when this was a new book. Many of the earliest settlers of Massachusetts were acutely conscious of the significance of what they had done when they separated themselves from their homeland. Their leaders were historically minded, fully aware of the importance of preserving the record of their proceedings. They understood the symbolic significance of a printing press as evidence of a cultural foundation, when this was added to the equipment of the colony, alongside of the college. These leaders and their associates who remained in England realized equally the practical advantages of press and college as encouragements to possible settlers who were hesitating to separate themselves from the refinements of life to which they had been accustomed in the Mother Country. These considerations, consciously or subconsciously, go far to explain the noteworthy fact that eleven copies of this BAY PSALM BOOK of 1640 are still in existence in public or private libraries. Eight of these never left New England, where five of them were collected by Thomas Prince before the middle of the eighteenth century.

The BAY PSALM BOOK is famous for reasons with which the work itself has nothing to do. It is also an extremely important book, for reasons that have nothing whatever to do with its fame, and which have not yet been convincingly explained. These reasons have to do with the religious development of the English people, and when they come to be clearly comprehended the spiritual foundation of the English character will be easier to understand.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cambridge Press, 1638-1692: A Reexamination of the Evidence concerning the Bay Psalm Book and the Eliot Indian Bible as Well as Other Contemporary Books and People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.