The Cambridge Press, 1638-1692: A Reexamination of the Evidence concerning the Bay Psalm Book and the Eliot Indian Bible as Well as Other Contemporary Books and People

By George Parker Winship | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
THE END OF HENRY DUNSTER

PROBING THE PAST

THERE was increasing activity at the Press after it was moved with the Dunster and Glover families and the Glover belongings into the President's new house in the Harvard Yard. Soon there were further changes in the domestic situation, which left Mr. Dunster with only the two children of his first wife and what remained of their father's American properties, of the cares that he married into in 1641. These children were ten years older than when they left the Sutton rectory, old enough to notice what they saw and heard going on around them. One thing they can hardly have avoided thinking about as they grew up. Most of the things in the house had been familiar to them from earliest childhood, in memories that went back far beyond the entrance into their lives of a new father and the subsequent advent of another mother. Their baby brother David was joined by a little sister Dorothy in the winter of 1647 and there was a baby Henry in 1650. In this year John Glover was graduated from the College and departed to enter upon medical studies at Aberdeen. These studies were interrupted when he was summoned to London by the death of his grandmother. That her will was of interest to him is implied by a letter in which he informed his brother-in-law John Appleton, who had married Priscilla Glover in 1651, that he wished her to have his American property. That this in his opinion included the printery and that the gift was not outright is shown by the steps which he took subsequently to secure possession of the Glover belongings which had passed into Mr. Dunster's control.

In 1650 the General Court directed its committee to agree "with the president for the printing of the laws with all expedition." In 1654 the laws of each session were ordered to be delivered "unto the president, or printer, who shall forthwith make an impression thereof." It is not certain whether the President was thought of as an individual proprietor in these votes or as the head of the College. But there can be no doubt that in 1655/6 Steven Day and Samuel Green agreed in assuming that all the profits from the operation of the printing business had accrued

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cambridge Press, 1638-1692: A Reexamination of the Evidence concerning the Bay Psalm Book and the Eliot Indian Bible as Well as Other Contemporary Books and People
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.