The Cambridge Press, 1638-1692: A Reexamination of the Evidence concerning the Bay Psalm Book and the Eliot Indian Bible as Well as Other Contemporary Books and People

By George Parker Winship | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
BUSINESS VICISSITUDES

MATHER PATRONAGE

DURING the years from 1668 to 1672 while Green and Johnson were working together, the younger man established himself in the good opinion of his Cambridge neighbors. He married, on April 28, 1670, Ruth Cane, a young woman whose parents lived next door to a house he had bought in the winter of 1665/6, and at a town meeting on November 11, 1672 he was chosen constable. On June 15, 1675 Judge Samuel Sewall attended a meeting of the Harvard Corporation and entered in his diary that it "met and chose Sir Thacher Fellow, Mr. Johnson Printer." The College record of this meeting includes a vote which refers to another entry already quoted:

that Mr. Marmaduke Johnson's bargain made May 27, 1673, ordered to be confirmed by writings, and his privilege of being of the college confirmed.

The College now owned everything that was left of what Mr. Glover brought in 1638, including a considerable assortment of fonts of type, of some of which little use had been made. This may have suffered from neglect and perhaps even more from irregular use. To this was added by loan in 1670 the use of the large amount of type secured in 1659 for the INDIAN BIBLE as well as that sent over in 1655 which was mingled with the other College type. The loan also gave a claim on the type brought over by Johnson in 1665. There was also the press that came in 1638, which was probably the one that had to be repaired once or twice with rawhide while the BIBLE was being printed, and the College had the use of the one sent over in 1660 for the Indian work. Johnson for his part owned a press of his own and he had in his possession all of the newer type which he brought from London in 1665, some of which he claimed as his own property.

The newer type could have been used for the printing done "by S. G. and M. J." from 1669 to 1671. None of the Cambridge imprints of these years that have been examined show signs of wear which would justify President Chauncy's diuturno usu valde attriti sunt, et ad usumTypographicum inepti sunt

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