Politics, Society, and the Klan in Alabama, 1915-1949

By Glenn Feldman | Go to book overview

14
World War II and Postwar Alabama

The Klan reemerged strongly in Alabama shortly after the end of World War II. This outbreak of the Klan strain has been difficult to explain. The period 1946 through 1949, a period half as long as Reconstruction in Alabama, has received insufficient attention. Nevertheless, the Klan that grew in Alabama during this time shared a number of features with its counterparts in earlier days. Indeed, although the Alabama KKK gathered marked momentum after 1945, the secret society and its engine of racial divisiveness were sores that festered throughout World War II.

While scholars have done a good deal to elucidate southern racial violence during the war, the postwar period has received far less attention.1 World War II was a watershed in southern economic history, but it also exerted a profound effect on the course of race relations in the South. Black activism, assertiveness, and agitation for voting rights all accelerated in the wake of war. After 1945, a cadre of progressive southern white politicians appealed with some success to a new biracial coalition of working-class whites and a small but growing black electorate. This progressive cabal was so successful in Alabama that the state soon boasted of having a progressive governor, two progressive senators, and the South's most liberal congressional delegation.2

Progressive electoral success in wartime and postwar Alabama was accompanied by a tense racial atmosphere and an increasingly violent backlash from the forces of white supremacy. The Klan rode again in this climate, targeting not only assertive blacks but also whites who challenged conventional notions of morality. Elite Alabamians from a variety of backgrounds responded in a number of ways.

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics, Society, and the Klan in Alabama, 1915-1949
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 460

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.