Law and the Conditions of Freedom in the Nineteenth- Century United States

By James Willard Hurst | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

The Julius Rosenthal Foundation for General Law

THIS volume is the text of a series of lectures delivered under the auspices of the Julius Rosenthal Foundation at Northwestern University School of Law, in March, 1955.

Julius Rosenthal, an eminent and beloved member of the Chicago bar, was born in Germany on September 17, 1828. He pursued his studies at the Universities of Heidelberg and Freiburg, came to Chicago in July, 1854, and was admitted to the bar in 1860. He was especially prominent as a practitioner in the law of wills and in probate and real estate law. As librarian of the Chicago Law Institute from 1867 to 1877 and again from 1888 to 1903, and as its president from 1878 to 1880, he was chiefly responsible for its development. He was a member of the First Board of State Law Examiners of Illinois, and its secretary from 1897 to 1899. He died May 14, 1905.

Julius Rosenthal was a lawyer of great learning and rare scholarly attainments. He labored long and earnestly to establish the highest standards of legal scholarship. Throughout his career, his interest in the Northwestern University School of Law was constantly manifested.

To honor his memory the Julius Rosenthal Foundation for General Law was established in 1919 by his son, Lessing Rosenthal, his daughter, Mrs. George Pick, and Charles H. Hamill, Max Hart, Harry Hart, Mark Cresap, Frank M. Peters, Leo P. Wormser, F. Howard Eldridge, Willard L. King, Magnus Myres, Mrs. Joseph Schaffner, and Mrs. Otto L. Schmidt, all of Chicago, and the Honorable Julian W. Mack, of New York. Additional funds were provided under the will of Lessing Rosenthal, who died in 1949. The income derived from the Foundation is, among other uses, applicable to the cultivation of legal literature, and particularly to the publication of meritorious essays, monographs, and books of a scientific or practical nature concerning the law; to the aid or encouragement of research in the field of legal literature and the preparation for publication of the results of such research; and to the delivery and publication of lectures on subjects concerning the law.

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