IX
KIKUYU 'LOYALISTS' AND HOME GUARDS

Although the Security Forces--represented by the Police and the Military in all their diverse branches--are naturally playing a very big part against the militant Mau Mau, the people who are in most constant opposition to them, through being in the closest contact, are the Kikuyu Home Guards. This body is, in the main, composed of 'loyalists', as those Kikuyu who are opposed to Mau Mau are locally termed.

This designation 'loyalist' is often misunderstood outside Kenya and is wrongly thought to indicate people who whole-heartedly support the policy of Government and of the Europeans in general. This is not quite the true position. I would say, rather, that the 'loyalists' are people who disapprove most strongly of Mau Mau's methods of trying to achieve their objective and who disagree, too, in part with Mau Mau aims and objects.

It would be wholly wrong, however, to think of the 'loyalists' as out-and-out supporters of the policy of Europeans in Kenya. On the other hand they are completely loyal to the Crown, as represented by Her Majesty the Queen.

By far the greatest number of 'loyalists' are either Christians or out-and-out believers in the old religion of the Kikuyu. Among the latter are men like Chief Njiri, who has no sympathy with Christianity, but who considers that Mau Mau transgresses against all his most cherished beliefs and can only bring down the anger of ' Mwene Nyaga' and of the ancestral spirits upon the Kikuyu tribe.

The leaders of the 'loyalists' include men from all walks of life, political leaders like Harry Thuku--the President of the Kikuyu Provincial Association--and his district

-110-

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Defeating Mau Mau
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I- The Present Position 1
  • II- Mau Mau Aims 21
  • III- Mau Mau Organisation 32
  • V- Mau Mau Propaganda 53
  • VI- Mau Mau Oath Ceremonies 77
  • VII- Mau Mau Methods 94
  • VIII- Mau Mau and Other Tribes 103
  • IX- Kikuyu 'Loyalists' and Home Guards 110
  • X- The Handicaps of The Security Forces 117
  • XI- What Must Be Done: Religious, Educational, and Economic Reforms 127
  • XII- What Must Be Done: Social and Political Reforms 142
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