The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll

By H. G. Wells | Go to book overview

THE MOONLIGHT RIDE

XXIV

AND so the twenty minutes' law passed into an infinity. We leave the wicked Bechamel clothing himself with cursing as with a garment,--the wretched creature has already sufficiently sullied our modest but truthful pages,--we leave the eager little group in the bar of the Vicuna. Hotel, we leave all Bognor as we have left all Chichester and Midhurst and Haslemere and Guildford and Ripley and Putney, and follow this dear fool of a Hoopdriver of ours and his Young Lady in Grey out upon the moonlight road. How they rode! How their hearts beat together and their breath came fast, and how every shadow was anticipation and every noise pursuit! For all that flight Mr. Hoopdriver was in the world of Romance. Had a policeman intervened because their lamps were not lit, Hoopdriver had cut him down and ridden on, after the fashion of a hero born. Had Bechamel arisen in the way with rapiers for a duel, Hoopdriver had fought as one to whom Agincourt was a reality

-157-

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The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • The Wheels of Chance 1
  • The Riding Forth of Mr. Hoopdriver 17
  • The Shameful Episode of the Young Lady in Grey 29
  • On the Road to Ripley 40
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Was Haunted 59
  • The Imaginings of Mr. Hoopdriver's Heart 69
  • Omissions 76
  • The Dreams of Mr. Hoopdriver 79
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Went to Haslemere 84
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Reached Midhurst 92
  • An Interlude 99
  • Of the Artificial in Man, and of the Zeitgeist 105
  • The Encounter at Midhurst 109
  • The Pursuit 127
  • At Bognor 136
  • The Moonlight Ride 157
  • The Surbiton Interlude 167
  • The Awakening of Mr. Hoopdriver 178
  • The Departure from Chichester 185
  • The Unexpected Anecdote of the Lion 197
  • The Rescue Expedition 207
  • Mr. Hoopdriver, Knight Errant 231
  • The Abasement of Mr. Hoopdriver 256
  • In the New Forest 280
  • At the Rufus Stone 297
  • The Envoy 317
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