American Immigration Policy, a Reappraisal

By William S. Bernard; Carolyn Zeleny et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

8
Effect of Immigration on American Population Growth

An intelligent attitude toward immigration necessarily depends on an understanding of the problems of population. An immigration policy based on restriction, as is our quota system, is inevitably a policy that affects population. It is a commonplace that the population of a country can increase in only two ways: through a surplus of births over deaths, and through immigration. Furthermore, whether the population of a country is increasing, remaining static, or declining will affect our attitude toward the desirability of immigration in general and the amount of immigration that should be permitted.

The population growth of the present area of the United States has been the most rapid in recorded history. Inhabited by a few hundred thousand Indians in the early seventeenth century, the continental United States in 1947 contains more than 141,000,000 inhabitants. By 1700 the colonial population had grown to 275,000, by 1750 to 1,207,000, and by 1790 to 3,929,000. There was continuous immigration from Europe during this period, and the native birth rate was at an extremely high level. There was a fairly high rate of increase until 1890, a slow decline in the rate until 1920, and the sharp decline for the decade 1930-1940 (see Appendix E, Table XII).

No official records were made of immigration prior to 1820. However, a reliable estimate places the number of immigrants between 1790 and 1820 at 250,000. Between 1820 and 1945 inclu

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Immigration Policy, a Reappraisal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?