Mirrors for Rebels: A Study of Polemical Literature Relating to the Northern Rebellion, 1569

By James K. Lowers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

THE TUDOR THEORY of subjection," Professor J. W. Allen has stated, "was fundamentally utilitarian: it has strict reference to immediate expediency and to time and place."1 The genesis and development of this doctrine of absolute nonresistance to the king have been described by Professors Allen2 and Frankin Le Van Baumer3 and require only brief summary here.

The pioneer work was William Tyndale Obedience of a Christian Man, pubished in Antwerp in 1528. The author was anxious to disprove the charge that reformers encourage disobedience to secular authority.4 Rejecting papal claims to temporal and spiritual supremacy, Tyndale argued that kings are, in effect, captives of prelates, and he enunciated a political theory the main theme of which is the divine right of kings to rule all their subjects as they choose and the subjects' unqualified obligation to obey. As a Protestant, Tyndale could hardly be accepted as a respectable writer in an England ruled by Henry VIII, who prided himself upon being Defender of the Faith. But important events were to make Tyndale's views welcome in Tudor England.

The King had sought to terminate the marriage with Catherine of Aragon since 1527, and through the offices of his Lord Chancellor, Thomas Wolsey, had exhausted every means in an attempt to have the Pope authorize the separation. Probably in 1529, the year of Wolsey's fall, Tyndale's book reached his hands. Henry is reported to have said, "This is a book for me and for all kings to read."5 The failure of Henry VIII's divorce suit led to the adoption of a new political theory: if Rome would not act favorably on the issue, let the King be recognized as head

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mirrors for Rebels: A Study of Polemical Literature Relating to the Northern Rebellion, 1569
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - Introduction 1
  • Chapter II - The Northern Rebellion of 1569 11
  • Chapter III - Pamphlets, Tracts, and Ballads, 1569-1574 35
  • Chapter IV - Pamphlets and Prose Tracts, 1581-1601 50
  • Chapter V - The Doctrine of Absolute Obedience 66
  • Chaptier VI - The Doctrine in Nonpolemical Literature 80
  • Chapter VII - Conclusion 107
  • Notes 113
  • Index 125
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 132

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.