XII
Public Life

MY first active part in national affairs began in 1915 with my chairmanship of the Vermont branch of the League to Enforce Peace. This was organized by ex-President Taft and President Lowell of Harvard. It was the first nationwide movement to support the replacement of force with international law. A state-wide correspondence was started, much aid was discovered, and some supporting funds were collected. In this undertaking, much of the detail was handled by a young man, Roderick Olzendam, a senior at the University of Vermont.

We held an organization meeting in Burlington under the sponsorship of Dr. Lowell. We held a rally in St. Johnsbury addressed by Mr. Taft. This meeting was sponsored by judge Ide of that town, who bad been Commissioner of American Samoa and had later served with Mr. Taft on the Commission which established our remarkable administration over the Philippine Islands.

The country-wide interest aroused was focused on a national meeting in Philadelphia, where plans were made for a grand banquet in Washington, to be attended by President Wilson.

That banquet was held in May of 1916, in the ballroom of the Willard Hotel. There Wilson announced his support of the project which afterwards became the League of Nations.

With this announcement and a strong body of public approval, our work seemed to be done, and the League to Enforce Peace

-165-

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Senator from Vermont
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Epistle vi
  • Table of Contents vii
  • I - Ancestral Life The Flanders Line, the Gilfillan Line, the Duncan Line 3
  • II - Early Life of My Father 11
  • III - Village Life in the Eighties and Nineties 13
  • IV - Education 23
  • V - Apprenticeship 46
  • VI - At the Drafting Board 63
  • VII - In the Metropolis 82
  • VIII - Engineer and Manager 104
  • IX - Religious Life 122
  • X - The Great Depression 132
  • XI - Travel 141
  • XII - Public Life 165
  • XIII - Economics, Legislation, and Politics 184
  • XIV - In the Senate 206
  • XV - 1953-1954, and Senator Mccarthy 250
  • XVI - Adventures of a Senatorial Free Lance 269
  • XVII - Putting Principles to the Test 283
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