The American Senator

By Anthony Trollope; John Halperin | Go to book overview

known. But at the moment she lacked the courage to walk boldly across the bridge, and thus to rid herself of Lawrence Twentyman. She had already perceived that Morton's manner had rendered it impossible that her lover should follow them. 'I am afraid I must go home,' she said. It was the very thing she did not want to do,-- this going home with Lawrence Twentyman; and yet she herself said that she must do it--driven to say so by a nervous dread of showing herself to be fond of the other man's company.

'Good afternoon to you,' said Morton very gloomily, waving his hat and stalking across the bridge.


CHAPTER VI
NOT IN LOVE

REGINALD MORTON, as he walked across the bridge towards the house, was thoroughly disgusted with all the world. He was very angry with himself, feeling that he had altogether made a fool of himself by his manner. He had shown himself to be offended, not only by Mr. Twentyman, but by Miss Masters also, and he was well aware, as he thought of it all, that neither of them had given him any cause of offence. If she chose to make an appointment for a walk with Mr. Lawrence Twentyman and to keep it, what was that to him? His anger was altogether irrational, and he knew that it was so. What right had he to have an opinion about it if Mary Masters should choose to like the society of Mr. Twentyman? It was an affair between him and her father and mother in which he could have no interest; and yet he had not only taken offence, but was well aware that he had shown his feeling.

Nevertheless, as to the girl herself, he could not argue himself out of his anger. It was grievous to him that he should have gone out of his way to ask her to walk with him just at the moment when she was expecting this vulgar lover--for that she had expected him he felt no doubt. Yet he had heard her disclaim any intention of

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