The American Senator

By Anthony Trollope; John Halperin | Go to book overview
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end of his cigar by the usual process of burning, so quickly did he eat the other end. But he took that which Mounser Green offered him without any displeasure at the allusion. 'I'm sorry to say that I haven't a spittoon,' said Mounser Green, 'but the whole fire-place is at your service.' The Senator could hardly have heard this, as it made no difference in his practice.

Morton at this moment was sent for by the Secretary of State, and the Senator expressed his intention of waiting for him in Mr. Green's room. 'How does the great Goarly case get on, Mr. Gotobed?' asked the clerk.

'Well! I don't know that it's getting on very much.'

'You are not growing tired of it, Senator?'

'Not by any means. But it's getting itself complicated, Mr. Green. I mean to gee the end of it, and if I'm beat,-- why I can take a beating as well as another man.'

'You begin to think you'll be beat?'

'I didn't say so, Mr. Green. It is very hard to understand all the ins and outs of a case like that in a foreign country.'

'Then I shouldn't try it, Senator.'

'There I differ. It is my object to learn all I can.'

'At any rate, I shouldn't pay for the lesson as you are like to do. What'll the bill be? Four hundred dollars?'

'Never mind, Mr. Green. If you'll take the opinion of a good deal older man than yourself and one who has perhaps worked harder, you'll understand that there's no knowledge got so thoroughly as that for which a man pays.' Soon after this Morton came out from the great man's room and went away in company with the Senator.


CHAPTER XXIX

THE SENATOR'S LETTER

SOON after this Senator Gotobed went down, alone, to Dillsborough and put himself up at the Bush Inn. Although he had by no means the reputation of being a rich man, he did not seem to care much what money he

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