The American Senator

By Anthony Trollope; John Halperin | Go to book overview

belonging to you?' Before all this was over, Reginald Morton had escaped, feeling that he could do no good to either side by remaining a witness to such a scene. He must take some other opportunity of finding the attorney, and of learning from him whether he intended that his daughter should be allowed to accept Lady Ushant's invitation.

Poor Mary, as she shrunk into the house, was nearly heartbroken. That such things should be at all was very dreadful, but that the scene should have taken place in the presence of Reginald Morton was an aggravation of the misery which nearly overwhelmed her. How could she make him understand whence had arisen her stepmother's anger, and that she herself had been neither sly nor deceitful nor pig-headed?


CHAPTER XLVII
'BUT THERE IS SOME ONE'

WHEN Mr. Masters had gone across to the Bush, his purpose had certainly been ignoble, but it had had no reference to brandy and water. And the allusion made by Mrs. Masters to the probable ruin which was to come from his tendencies in that direction had been calumnious, for she knew that the man was not given to excess in liquor. But as he approached his own house, he bethought himself that it would not lead to domestic comfort if he were seen returning from his walk with Mary, and he had therefore made some excuse as to the expediency of saying a word to Runciman, whom he espied at his own door. He said his word to Runciman, and so loitered away perhaps a quarter of an hour, and then went back to his office. But his wife had kept her anger at burning heat, and pounced upon him before he had taken his seat. Sundown was there copying, sitting with his eyes intent on the board before him, as though he were quite unaware of the sudden entrance of his master's wife. She, in her fury, did not regard Sundown in the least, but at once commenced her attack. 'What is all this, Mr. Masters,'

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