The American Senator

By Anthony Trollope; John Halperin | Go to book overview

EXPLATORY NOTES
1prebendaries: honorary canons--or for that matter any clergyman receiving an honorarium for serving in the church.

graziers: ranchers; cattle-grazers.

those modern improvements which have of late become common throughout England: probably a reference to the Victorian gothic effort to restore and at the same time modernize ancient ecclesiastical fabrics--a widespread fad during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Thomas Hardy ( 18401- 1928) was engaged in this sort of work as a young man. It was part of the aftermath of the Oxford Movement as well as of the gothic revival; a number of eighteenth-century churches were 'improved' in an attempt to make them look gothic. Many architectural historians have deplored this late Victorian mania for 'modernizing'--nor does Trollope, who apparently uses the phrase 'modern improvements' ironically here, seem enthusiastic about them. In The Mayor of Casterbridge ( 1886), however, Hardy refers to eighteenth-century architecture as 'a compilation rather than a design' (ch. 21).

3posting inns: inns where horses were changed for fast carriages, especially those transporting the mail.

farmers' ordinary: a tavern or eating house serving meals to all at a fixed price.

to beat up wine: to mix by stirring, or whip up.

chancel: that part of a church lying east of the nave, including choir and sanctuary.

4Ribston pippins: apples especially popular in the nineteenth century, grown from seedlings rather than cuttings.
5coverts: hiding places affording cover for game.

Hurlingham: an exclusive social and sports club (still extant) in Fulham, London.

those who go out with the hounds: that is, those who hunt foxes.

8Brasenose: Brasenose College, Oxford.

Quieta non movere: the Latin equivalent of Sir Robert

-559-

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