Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant

By Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.

PROMOTION TO FIRST LIEUTENANT --CAPTURE OF THE CITY OF
MEXICO
--THE ARMY --MEXICAN SOLDIERS --PEACE NEGOTIA-
TIONS
--TREATY OF PEACE --MEXICAN BULL FIGHTS --REGI-
MENTAL QUARTERMASTER
--TRIP TO POPOCATAPETL --TRIP
TO THE CAVES OF MEXICO
.

ON entering the city the troops were fired upon by the released convicts, and possibly by deserters and hostile citizens. The streets were deserted, and the place presented the appearance of a "city of the dead," except for this firing by unseen persons from house-tops, windows, and around corners. In this

NOTE.--It had been a favorite idea with General Scott for a great many years before the Mexican war to have established in the United States a soldiers' home, patterned after something of the kind abroad, particularly, I believe, in France. He recommended this uniformly, or at least frequently, in his annual reports to the Secretary of War, but never got any hearing. Now, as he had conquered the state, he made assessments upon the different large towns and cities occupied by our troops, in proportion to their capacity to pay, and appointed officers to receive the money. In addition to the sum thus realized he had derived, through capture at Cerro Gordo, sales of captured government tobacco, etc., sums which swelled the fund to a total of about $220,000. Portions of this fund were distributed among the rank and file, given to the wounded in hospital, or applied in other ways, leaving a balance of some $118,000 remaining unapplied at the close of the wars. After the war was over and the troops all home, General Scott applied to have this money, which had never been turned into the Treasury of the United States, expended in establishing such homes as he had previously recommended. This fund was the foundation of the Soldiers' Home at Washington City, and also one at Harrodsburgh, Kentucky.

The latter went into disuse many years ago. In fact it never had many soldiers in it, and was, I believe, finally sold.

-98-

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Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Preface. 7
  • Contents 9
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. 15
  • Chapter II 32
  • Chapter III 54
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter V 98
  • Chapter VI 115
  • Chapter VII 137
  • Chapter VIII 160
  • Chapter IX 187
  • Chapter X 220
  • Chapter XI 250
  • Chapter XII 279
  • Chapter XIII 312
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Vol. II 345
  • Chapter XIV 347
  • Chapter XV 381
  • Chapter XVI 423
  • Chapter XVIII 505
  • Chapter XIX 563
  • Chapter XX 599
  • Chapter XXI 635
  • Index 667
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