The Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: An Introduction

By Richard F. Staar | Go to book overview

Chapter 2 BULGARIA:
Prussia of the Balkans

IN a geographical sense, Bulgaria occupies a rather special position in the communist bloc of Eastern Europe. Anchored on the southern flank of the former satellite belt, it is unique in having just one other bloc neighbor ( Romania to the north) and in being the only country to border on more than two non-bloc states ( Turkey and Greece to the south, Yugoslavia to the west).1 Also, Bulgaria shares with East Germany the distinction of remaining under Soviet influence without being contiguous with the U.S.S.R.

Bulgaria, slightly smaller than New York State, encompasses 42,818 square miles within its dimensions of roughly 250 by 150 miles. Significant topographical features include the Danubian tableland across the north; the Balkan mountains in the center; the Thracian plains to the south; and mountains in the southwest. The national language is Slavic but shows the influence of Turkish and Greek. The population, composed of about 91 percent ethnic Bulgarians and 9 percent Turks, was estimated at the end of 1969 to be 8.5 million, of which roughly 4.4 million were classified as urban (51.4 percent) and 3.1 million as rural (48.6 percent).2


HISTORY

For five hundred years Bulgaria was under Turkish rule, with the decline of which came oppression, all the less tolerable because of the new standards and aspirations resulting from the penetration of modern ideas from Western Europe.3

____________________
1
Bulgaria. Statisticheski godishnik na Narodna Republika Bulgariya, 1969 ( Sofia, 1969), p. 2.
2
Rabotnichesko delo, January 1, 1970. Only 39.1 percent of the labor force is employed in agriculture. Ibid., April 29, 1970.
3
L. A. D. Dellin (ed.), Bulgaria ( New York, 1957), pp. 6-7; hereafter cited as Dellin, Bulgaria.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.