The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History

By Scott M. Cutlip | Go to book overview
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NOTES ON SOURCES

Information for this introduction was based on a wide reading of history of the early 20th Century when public relations first emerged as a identifiable vocation. The following sources were used: Ray Stannard Baker, "Railroads on Trial," McClure's Magazine, Vol. 26, March, 1906 (this article also can be found in Arthur and Lila Weinbergs' The Muckrakers, A Collection of Articles That Fueled the Revolt of the Progressive Era, Simon & Schuster, 1961); Edward L. Bernays, Autobiography of an Idea. Memoirs of Edward L. Bernays, Simon & Schuster, 1965; Merle Curti, The Growth of American Thought 3rd. ed. Harper & Row, 1964; Elmer E. Cornwell Jr. , Presidential Leadership of Public Opinion, Indiana University Press, 1963 (traces the rise of Presidential Government that started with President Theodore Roosevelt's mastery of public relations); Pendleton Dudley, "Current Beginnings of PR," Public Relations Journal, Vol. 8, August, 1952; Eric F. Goldman, Two-Way Street, 1948 (a sketchy history of the field's origins), N. S. B. Gras, Business History of the United States about 1650 to 1950s (a 3-volume transcript edited by his widow, Ethel Gras, and distributed by Lincoln Educational Foundation, 1967).

Richard Hofstader, The Age of Reform, Knopf, 1955, who wrote that "It was muckraking that brought the diffuse malaise into focus", Ralph. W. Hower , The History of an Advertising Agency, N. W. Ayer & Sons at Work, Harvard University Press, 1939 (This agency pioneered in use of publicity to supplement advertising), Arthur S. Link, Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era, Harper, 1954 (traces development of Wilson New Freedom. Also see his American Epoch, Knopf, 1965); Luther B. Little, "The Printing Press in Politics," Munsey's Magazine, Vol. 23, September 23, 1900, Peter Lyon, Success Story, The Life and Times of S. S. McClure, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1963, biography of the leader of the Muckraking Movement; Alan Raucher, Public Relations and Business, 1900-1929, Johns Hopkins Press (details emergence of public relations in its early years); C. C. Regier, The Era of the Muckrakers, University of North Carolina Press, 1932 (neglects role of major daily newspapers in fomenting public revolt); Edward A. Ross, Changing America: Stuidies in Contemporary Society, Century Company, 1914 (Thoughts of a pioneer sociologist and strong critic of the ways of Big Business).

Upton Sinclair, Autobiography, 1st. ed. Harcourt Brace & World, 1962. This remarkable man re-emerges in chapter 19 as the catylst for the modern campaign consultant, today a major field of public relations. William Allen White , A Puritan in Babylon, the Story of Calvin Coolidge, Macmillan Company, 1938. White was a colorful Kansas editor of those years.

-9-

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