The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History

By Scott M. Cutlip | Go to book overview
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Chapter 6
Ivy Lee Returns to New York; Joined By T. J. Ross

Ivy Lee's last service for the American Red Cross came at the war's end when he was asked to accompany Chairman Henry P. Davison to Europe on a fact-finding mission for President Wilson. Lee was somewhat reluctant to take on this assignment because of the demands of a growing list of clients and his desire to make money. Lee did agree in this instance to let the Red Cross pay his traveling expenses. In a telegram to John D. Rockefeller, Jr. dated December 13, 1918, Lee wired:

Davison sails Monday response to President's request that he undertake international Red Cross mission. Both Davison and War Council consider it important that I serve as a member of the commission on theory great delicacy of presentation vital consequence to ultimate success. . . . Have considered the matter with great earnestness myself, feeling extremely reluctant to leave, in view of the fact that my service to the Red Cross has not only been of great expense directly but has been the cause of losing considerable business I might have had. Opportunities for my activities on substantial scale have been developing with great rapidity ever since prospects of peace loomed up. . . . I have concluded that in spite of the very material sacrifice that this would mean for me I have no right to decline to perform this service if my clients are willing that in my absence my office should care for their affairs.


IVY L. LEE & ASSOCIATES FORMED IN 1920

In 1920, Lee decided to reorganize Lee, Harris, and Lee and rename it Ivy L. Lee & Associates with offices at 61 Broadway in Lower Manhattan. An

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