The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History

By Scott M. Cutlip | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
Bernays: The Counselor and His Genius and His Role in the Profession

As he stressed in Crystallizing Public Opinion, Edward L. Bernays saw himself as counselor to his clients, not as the head of a large public relations service agency like those built by Ivy Lee, Pendleton Dudley, Carl Byoir, and other pioneers of this vocation. As he put in his interview of March 12, 1959:

Counsel on public relations is a profession. A doctor, lawyer, architect does not work on an account executive basis if he is carrying on true professional activities. He may have partners or associates, but the client knows that he is getting a professional. We regard what we do as a personal service. . . . I do not feel the public relations profession is fulfilling its highest function in satisfying the social and economic needs of the society if it simply functions like a factory. I have no objection to organizations with hundreds of people who Write communications material for their clients with news desks, magazine desks, and the like. Instead of working to expand our organization in number of personnel, we have worked to make our services of counseling worth more to the client and society. From an economic standpoint, the public relations counsel earns as much with a few people as thirty.

The client got Bernays' personal attention and with that quite imaginative solutions to pubic relations problems. These following illustrations suffice to document his imaginative and innovative techniques, examples he often recited in his writings and his lectures.

One of Bernays' oft-told tales is how he quelled the rumors that the famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel was about to close, rumors fueled by talk of tearing down the original structure and building a more magnificent hotel in

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Unseen Power: Public Relations, a History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 812

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.