Midterm: The Elections of 1994 in Context

By Philip A. Klinkner | Go to book overview

in 1994 categorized their Democratic House candidates as conservative. 5 This dropped among respondents from these districts in 1994 to just 18 percent. This change is quite notable given past research showing that voters are significantly more likely to split their tickets when they perceived little to no difference between their Democratic House candidate and the Republican opponent ( Frymer, Kim, and Bimes 1995). It is also telling that in the 15 southern districts that voted for Bush in 1988 and 1992 but reelected Democratic House members in 1994, the perception of their House members has remained considerably more conservative, (of these voters 45 percent perceived their House members as conservative).


CONCLUSION

One of the ironies of the Democratic party's losses in 1994 is that even with fewer southern Democratic House members than ever before, there are now more liberal Democratic House members from the region than at any time prior to 1992. The implementation since the 1990 Census of minority-majority House districts, districts created to include a majority of racial minority voters in order to comply with the Voting Rights Act, is largely responsible, and the representative styles of those serving African-American and Latino majorities have changed dramatically ( Grofman, Griffin, and Glazer 1994; Bullock 1994). The impact of these districts has extended beyond a collective change in voting scores among southern House members; the increased number of African-American representatives has significantly bolstered the influence of the Congressional Black Caucus as a legislative organization. After years of watching its legislative efforts from the margins of the Democratic party, the 38 members of the Caucus wielded considerable influence in the 103rd Congress on highly visible matters, such as the 1994 crime bill, President Clinton's Haitian policy, and important budget and deficit-reducing proposals.

Nonetheless, racially based redistricting is currently a popular explanation for the Democratic party's electoral losses in the South. It is argued that moderate white Democrats were defeated by Republican challengers in 1992 and 1994 because a sizeable number of their constituents were moved into newly created districts designed to provide safe majorities for African-American candidates ( Hill 1995). This has effectively divided the two parties in the region along quite stark racial lines. In Georgia, for example, Nathan Deal's switch to the Republican party after the 1994 election left the state with 8 Republican representatives, all of whom are white, and 3 Democratic representatives, all of whom are black.

To blame Democratic electoral defeats solely on minority-majority districts, however, is to neglect the ongoing transformation in southern white voting behavior. As the research in this chapter suggests, more and more white voters have been moving towards the Republican party for the last three decades. The significance of minority-majority districts on the electoral outcome of the 1994 elections is not just that the loss of black constituents left white Democratic incumbents vulnerable but that an influential Congressional Black Caucus inadvertently helped speed up the realigning process by aiding the passage of liberal

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Midterm: The Elections of 1994 in Context
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.