What Women Want-What Men Want: Why the Sexes Still See Love and Commitment So Differently

By John Marshall Townsend | Go to book overview

5
What Do Men Want?

Men's Criteria for Choosing Partners

And it came to pass in an evening-tide that David arose from off his bed and walked upon the roof of the king's house: and from the roof he saw a woman washing herself; and the woman was very beautiful to look upon. And David sent and enquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bath-sheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite? And David sent messengers, and took her; and she came in unto him, and he lay with her. . . .

--2 Samuel 11: 2-4

I am persuaded that there is absolutely no limit to the absurdities that can. . . come to be generally believed. . . I will undertake, within 30 years, to make the majority of the population believe that two and two are three, that water freezes when it gets hot and boils when it gets cold, or any other nonsense. . . Of course, even when these beliefs had been generated, people would not put the kettle in the refrigerator when they wanted it to boll. That cold makes water boll would be a Sunday truth, sacred and mystical, to be professed in awed tones, but not to be acted on in daily life.

-- Bertrand Russell, "An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish"


Men and Mate Selection

FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS, researchers have been telling us that men emphasize physical attractiveness and women stress socioeconomic status when they choose dating and marriage partners. But numerous writers predicted that these sex differences would begin to decline as women achieved economic independence. This does not seem to be happening. Psychologist David Buss recently tested 100 college students and found that in reporting the qualities they most desired in mates, women emphasized earning capacity and education, and men emphasized physical attractiveness. Some researchers have questioned whether results that are reported by college

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