Area Handbook for Ivory Coast

By T. D. Roberts; Donald M. Bouton et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
ETHNIC GROUPS AND LANGUAGES

It is commonplace to observe that African boundaries are artificial in that they do not correspond to ethnohistorical divisions. In few parts of Africa is this as true as in the Ivory Coast. As a broad generalization, the Ivory Coast may be thought of as a square, in each quarter of which resides several related ethnic groups. These related groups are parts of larger entities which cut across national boundaries. In each case, the Ivory Coast segment of the larger entity is but a small part of it, an extension away from its cultural and spiritual center. Furthermore, none of these four culture provinces can be said clearly to predominate in Ivory Coast life, and probably no single ethnic group comprises more than 15 percent of the total population. The Ivory Coast is thus, ethnically speaking, a total accident.

Ethnic differences are, in part, related to geographic regions. The eighth parallel, which lies about midway in the country, roughly divides the country between the savanna woodland region (and the savanna peoples) and the dense forest region (and the forest peoples). The forest, in turn, is split about midway by the Bandama River, west of which lies the densest forest. The river serves to some extent as an ethnic boundary. These geographic correlates of ethnic differences should not be overstressed, as some "forest peoples" live in the southern tips of the savanna woodland region (Baoulé, Yacouba, Bété, Gouro) (see fig. 7).

In the southeast the indigenous population belongs to the East Atlantic or Eburneo-Beninian Family. The two principal branches to be found in the Ivory Coast are the Lagoon Cluster and the AgniBaoulé subbranch of the Akan peoples. In the southwest is a series of small groups belonging to the West Atlantic Family. The two main groupings are the Krou peoples and the Peripheral Mandé (or Mandéfou) peoples. In the northwest the'. peoples belong to the Mandingo (Nuclear Mandé or Soudanese) Family. Most of those in the northwest Ivory Coast are Malinké; a few are Bambara; and further east there is a concentration of Dioula. In the northeast and north-center the peoples belong to the Voltaic Family. The two largest groups are the Sénoufo, in the center, and the Koulango, in the northeast.

There has never been a census for the whole of the Ivory Coast. Hence the sizes of the various ethnic groups represent estimates only (see table 1). As a general rule, the indigenous population is vastly

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Area Handbook for Ivory Coast
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.