Multi-Party Politics in Kenya: The Kenyatta & Moi States & the Triumph of the System in the 1992 Election

By David W. Throup; Charles Hornsby | Go to book overview

Six
KANU Fights Back December 1991-October 1992

KANU in Crisis

By the end of 1991 KANU was in serious difficulties. The fall-out from the Commission of Enquiry into the death of Foreign Minister Dr Robert Ouko, implicating Energy Minister Nicholas Biwott, Permanent Secretary Hezekiah Oyugi, Nyanza Provincial Commissioner Julius Kobia and Nakuru District Commissioner Jonah Anguka, posed serious problems for the Moi regime, further eroding support among Luos. Before Ouko's murder in February 1990 and the suspicious death of Bishop Alexander Muge of Eldoret in August that year, Moi's defenders had contrasted the regime's treatment of outspoken critics with the murders of Pio da Gama Pinto, Tom Mboya and Josiah Mwangi Kariuki during the Kenyatta era. Although KANU had become increasingly authoritarian and more people were held in detention, the Moi government in its first decade had refrained from murdering opponents. Ouko's death appeared to mark a new era of violent intimidation.

Although Ouko had been far less popular than Tom Mboya, the ruling party nevertheless risked mass defections in Luoland. In 1969, following Mboya's assassination, incumbent Luo MPs who had failed to disassociate themselves from the regime had been repudiated by the voters at the ensuing general election. The Moi government was in a desperate plight as Kikuyu voters had been completely alienated by the regime's deliberate shift of resources from Central Province and the Kikuyu regions of the Rift Valley. By early 1992 KANU's position was also under attack among the Gusii and Abaluhya. The non-Kalenjin 'settler' communities in the Rift Valley were alarmed by the Kalenjin demand for Majimboism and by threats of 'ethnic cleansing' unless they declared their loyalty to President Moi and KANU. The ruling party's supporters in Rift Valley Province -- the Kalenjin, Maasai, Samburu and Turkana -- comprised only 15 per cent of Kenya's population and controlled 34 or 35 seats in the National Assembly,

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multi-Party Politics in Kenya: The Kenyatta & Moi States & the Triumph of the System in the 1992 Election
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Figures, Tables & Photographs v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • One - Introduction 1
  • Two - The Independence Struggle the Development of Political Consciousness 7
  • Three - The Creation of the Moi State 26
  • Notes 51
  • Four - The Regime in Crisis, January 1990-December 1991 54
  • Notes 88
  • Five - The Rise and Fall of the Opposition, December 1991-October 1992 92
  • Notes 164
  • Six - Kanu Fights Back December 1991-October 1992 173
  • Notes 237
  • Seven - The Electoral Process 242
  • Notes 285
  • Eight - The Beginnings of the Campaign & the Party Primaries 288
  • Notes 335
  • Nine - The Election Campaign 339
  • Notes 417
  • Ten - Election Day & the Results 424
  • Notes 451
  • Eleven - Why Kanu Won 453
  • Notes 527
  • Twelve - Kanu Rules the Nation 533
  • Thirteen - Conclusions the Emergence of Multi-Party Competition 582
  • Notes 603
  • Appendices 604
  • Index 642
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 660

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.