Political and Civil Rights in the United States

By Thomas I. Emerson; David Haber | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

I

The American people today are in broad agreement concerning the basic values and fundamental principles of a democratic society. But in the attempt to realize the common values and to apply the accepted principles sharp differences of opinion have arisen. This book undertakes to collect some of the materials relevant to one aspect of these problems of democracy in action. It deals with the operation of the vital mechanisms of the democratic process. Its aim is to throw light upon those institutions, rules and procedures of our society which keep the system functioning on a democratic level, which permit our people to solve their problems through the exercise of democratic choice, which, in short, form the ground rules for the practice of democracy.

The problems here treated flow immediately from practical application of the accepted principles. In a society based upon human dignity and the development of the individual personality, clearly all members are entitled to security of the person -- protection from bodily harm, involuntary servitude, and the fear of physical restraint. Yet in some areas of the nation, and for some groups in our society, this basic right is consistently or intermittently infringed. How is this problem to be met? What should the role of the Federal Government be? Is additional legislation necessary? How can our police and court systems be adjusted to guarantee effective protection?

Our tradition calls for the extension of various procedural safeguards to individuals who come into conflict with the law. We accept an accusatorial rather than an inquisitorial system of justice. Our theory is that the individual, pitted against the overwhelming power, prestige and resources of the government, is entitled to certain equalizing rights, even though some of the guilty escape as a result. These protections constitute a major portion of the Bill of Rightsembodied in our Constitution. But how far should the police go in seeking to extract a confession from a suspected prisoner? What is the extent of the right to counsel and how can it be assured in fact? What are the rights of the police to search for and seize evidence? Should their investigatory powers extend to tapping telephone wires or the use of similar devices for obtaining evidence? Where is the line to be drawn between protection of the individual and the right of society to solve its crime problem? And how can the courts

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political and Civil Rights in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.