Political and Civil Rights in the United States

By Thomas I. Emerson; David Haber | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The materials have been organized in terms of problems rather than of legal doctrine. Thus issues of freedom of speech under the First Amendment, or "state action" under the Fourteenth, run through a number of chapters. We have used this organization in order to emphasize the concrete issues at stake and to bring to bear on those issues all relevant considerations, whether from legal or other sources. In order to facilitate use of the book along doctrinal lines, however, we have striven to make the index as complete as possible.

The necessities of space have forced us to limit or omit materials on a number of important problems. We particularly regret the lack of space to deal adequately with issues relating to aliens, political and civil rights in periods of emergency, problems of military law, and human rights in the world community. Nor have we dealt adequately with the right of private association or the operation of the democratic process within private organizations.

Although many of the footnotes attached to extracts reprinted have been retained, many others have been omitted. Except where we have wished to call the omitted footnote to the reader's attention, we have not indicated the omission. Nor have we attempted to renumber the footnotes.

The authors confess to a strong bias in favor of political and civil rights. We have accepted throughout the assumptions inherent in a system of democratic values. Within this framework, however, we have attempted to present the materials in an objective manner. Our purpose has been to bring to the reader, so far as possible, the relevant facts and the significant points of view, leaving it up to each individual to make his own judgment.

It is a healthy sign of a vigorous interest in political and civil rights that so many persons have given so generously of their time and effort to assist in the preparation of this volume. We can acknowledge here only a few. We are particularly indebted to our colleague, Professor Theodore M. Greene, who prepared a special contribution for the chapter on Academic Freedom; to Sheila Spaulding, who was responsible for a substantial share of that chapter; and to Ruth Calvin Goldman, who did research on a number of chapters. We wish also to record the valuable assistance rendered by David Helfeld, Richard Schifter, Lisa Sandler, Yolanda Chambers, William and Georgia Delano,

-xv-

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