Survey of American Painting: October Twenty-Fourth [To] December Fifteenth, 1940

By Carnegie Institute | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

THE make-up of the retrospective portion of this Survey of American Painting has depended upon the coöperation of men and women whose interest has exceeded the amount usually accorded by those who serve on formal bodies of organization. I wish I might refer to this group as our executive committee. I have no authority so to do, nor did they ever meet in this connection. Nevertheless, we of the Department of FineArts of Carnegie Institute would express wholehearted thanks to each of them individually.

To Mr. Daniel Catton Rich, Director of Fine Arts of The Art Institute of Chicago, we acknowledge indebtedness for exhaustive advice as to which artists to choose and where to obtain the best examples of these artists.

To Mr. Virgil Barker we extend our appreciation for the results of his scholarship as applied to our compilation of the available material.

To Mr. Lloyd Goodrich, Research Curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, we owe a debt of gratitude for detailed revision of our estimates.

To Mr. Robert G. McIntyre we evince our esteem for his cordial application to our problem of his understanding of American painting.

To Mr. Henri Marceau, Assistant Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Curator of the John G. Johnson Collection, we recognize our obligation. In the midst of a busy winter he contributed to our research an extensive knowledge with special reference to the Philadelphia background.

To Mr. Royal Cortissoz, dean of American art critics, we are grateful for his comments on our original lists of artists.

We depended also on others whose counsel assisted us in rehearsing the varied story of American painting. We think of: Mr. Frederic L. Ballard, Mr. John I. H. Baur, Mr. Albert Christ-Janer, Mr. Henry La Farge and Miss Belle da Costa Greene.

For the success of our work in New York City we relied on the aid of generous collectors and on contributions from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art and The Brooklyn Museum.

We carried our initial request to Mr. George Blumenthal, President of The Metropolitan Museum. Mr. Blumenthal remarked, "I think, Mr. Saint-Gaudens, that The Metropolitan Museum can lend you anything you want within reason." Whereat The Metropolitan Museum, through the support of Mr. William M. Ivins, Jr., Acting Director, Mr. Francis Henry Taylor, incoming Director, and Mr. Harry B. Wehle, Curator of Paintings, supplied our need of their best American canvases. As further proof of The Metropolitan Museum's cordiality Mr. Hermann W. Williams, Jr., Assistant Curator of Paintings, discussed with me the collection on their walls and in their storerooms and for weeks afterward answered our flood of telegrams seeking information concerning loans from other sources.

By way of her enthusiasm and immediate information, Mrs. Juliana Force, Director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, rendered us assistance that no other person could have supplied. She saw to it that every request from her organization was granted and guided our efforts into productive channels.

-vii-

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Survey of American Painting: October Twenty-Fourth [To] December Fifteenth, 1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgment vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Sales 22
  • Part One Retrospective Section 23
  • Part Two Contemporary Section 95
  • Plates--Part One Retrospective Section 147
  • Plates--Part Two Contemporary Section 237
  • Index 285
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