Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

6
The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment

This chapter is designed to deal with the nature of speech- correction work and the demands it makes upon those who do it, be they parents, classroom teachers, speech-correction teachers, or members of a speech-clinic staff. Speech correction is reëducation, not merely removal of the defect.

Qualifications of the professional speech correctionist. As the last chapter pointed out, not only is personality built about differences in speech, but also profound emotional reaction-patterns are often associated with these differences. Then, too, reëducation frequently demands much of a child in the way of courage, persistence, and applied intelligence. All of these characteristics of the speech-correction situation make certain demands upon the speech correctionist in terms of professional attitudes, academic preparation, personal qualifications, and skill in handling other people.

Speech correction, if it has not as yet attained a professional status, is so steadily achieving one that it behooves all workers in the field to conduct themselves according to a strict code of ethics, to join the American Speech Correction Association, and to keep abreast of the research which is contributing greatly to our knowledge of causes and techniques. The speech correctionist must recognize the delimitation of his field from that of the physician, the psychiatrist, and the orthodontist. He must be prepared to

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Speech Correction: Principles and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • I - Speech Handicaps and the Need for Speech Correction 1
  • References 9
  • 2 - The Nature of Speech 12
  • References 36
  • 3 - The Development of Speech 39
  • References 48
  • 4 - Recognition and Prevention of Speech Disorders 51
  • References 59
  • 5 - The Speech Defective 62
  • References 89
  • 6 - The Speech Correctionist and General Procedures in Treatment 93
  • References 112
  • 7 - The Case History 114
  • References 138
  • 8 - Special Tests and Examination Methods 140
  • References 153
  • Speech Tests 156
  • References 181
  • 10 - Treatment of the Child Who Has Not Learned to Talk 183
  • References 206
  • II - Treatment of Articulatory Disorders 208
  • References 264
  • 12 - The Treatment of Voice Disorders 269
  • References 309
  • 13 - The Treatment of Stuttering 316
  • References 392
  • 14 - Cleft-Palate Speech 402
  • References 413
  • 15 - The Problem of Bilingualism and Foreign Dialect 416
  • References 426
  • Index 429
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