Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview

and speaks, first slowly then speeding up, the two syllables until they are plainly integrated. Later on, the teacher and child can prepare some word, and the parent should be asked to guess what it is. Once words have been achieved, the child should always be taught to sound them out as well as to speak them as wholes. This is important, because the act of integrating sequences of speech sounds is probably one of the most important tools of speech acquisition. Without it, the child is deprived of an important aid in learning new words by himself.

After the child has mastered his first primitive vocabulary project and consistently uses the words when speaking to the teacher, the parent should take over the task of bringing them into his daily life. This is done through the building up of proper speech standards and through the use of nucleus situations, negative practice, speech assignments, and good-natured penalties and rewards. The student is referred to the chapter on the treatment of articulatory disorders for a more detailed discussion of this last part of the therapy.


References

1. Brown F. W., "Baby Talkers," Proceedings of the American Speech Correction Association, 1936, Vol. 6, pages 198-207. A discussion of the emotional etiology of delayed speech of the jargon type. Methods for prevention and remedial adjustment are included.

2. Day E. J., "The Development of Language in Twins. I. A Comparison of Twins and Single Children," Child Development, 1932, Vol. 3, pages 46-52. An experimental study of language development in twins, showing marked retardation, presumably due to the use of the other twin as a language model or as a social substitute for language need.

3. Froeschels E., Psychological Elements in Speech, pages 72- 86, Boston, Expression Co., 1932. An excellent description of the treatment of a speechless child who seemed to be aphasic. The author also mentions the preva

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